thatdudeonbass:

studioafrica:

WE ARE ALL AFROFUTURISTS: A REMINDER

by Kareem Reid (westindians)

“Afrofuturism” might sound like an impenetrable theoretical art term but simply put, it involves the act of re-imagination, reclamation of black identity – a rejection and subversion of debilitating stereotypes, an expression of the infinite ways of interpreting the past, present & future, demonstrating the cosmopolitan reality of the black experience.  

Visually, this usually takes the form of adopting influences from a distant, mythologized African past and ideas of the future (for example, references to outer space or extraterrestrial life) to create something distinctly modern or futuristic. “Afrofuturism” is a way of understanding and creating art that is ultimately about challenging pre-existing modes of perception.

Some great articles / blogs on Afrofuturism:

The Aesthetics of Afro-futurism

afrofuturisticlingo

afrocyberpunk.com

 

 

Shabazz palaces


(Source: phattygirls)


thetpr:

I love my skin!

Because Lupita
And for the little Brothers and Sisters

(Source: arthaemisia)


hayandrea:

kairebelious:

dreams can come true for anybody

I’d be crying omg

(Source: kimkanyekimye)


bblackgoldd:

spacejam2005:

nothing was the same

That last gif took forever to load but I’m so glad I waited

(Source: whywelovedrake)

Anonymous asked:
You're a stupid nigger. You hate white people so much but without them you wouldn't have the McDonald's you so clearly love you fat fucking loser

unrivaledbeauty:

paranormal-blacktivity:

If it weren’t for black people you wouldn’t have:

  • air conditioning unit: Frederick M. Jones; July 12, 1949
  • almanac: Benjamin Banneker; Approx 1791
  • auto cut-off switch: Granville T. Woods; January 1,1839
  • auto fishing devise: G. Cook; May 30, 1899
  • automatic gear shift: Richard Spikes; February 28, 1932
  • baby buggy: W.H. Richardson; June 18, 1899
  • bicycle frame: L.R. Johnson; Octber 10, 1899
  • biscuit cutter: A.P. Ashbourne; November 30, 1875
  • blood plasma bag: Charles Drew; Approx. 1945
  • cellular phone: Henry T. Sampson; July 6, 1971
  • chamber commode: T. Elkins; January 3, 1897
  • clothes dryer: G. T. Sampson; June 6, 1862
  • curtain rod: S. R. Scratton; November 30, 1889
  • curtain rod support: William S. Grant; August 4, 1896
  • door knob: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • door stop: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • dust pan: Lawrence P. Ray; August 3, 1897
  • egg beater: Willie Johnson; February 5, 1884
  • electric lampbulb: Lewis Latimer; March 21, 1882
  • elevator: Alexander Miles; October 11, 1867
  • eye protector: P. Johnson; November 2, 1880
  • fire escape ladder: J. W. Winters; May 7, 1878
  • fire extinguisher: T. Marshall; October 26, 1872
  • folding bed: L. C. Bailey; July 18, 1899
  • folding chair: Brody & Surgwar; June 11, 1889
  • fountain pen: W. B. Purvis; January 7, 1890
  • furniture caster: O. A. Fisher; 1878
  • gas mask: Garrett Morgan; October 13, 1914
  • golf tee: T. Grant; December 12, 1899
  • guitar: Robert F. Flemming, Jr. March 3, 1886
  • hair brush: Lydia O. Newman; November 15,18–
  • hand stamp: Walter B. Purvis; February 27, 1883
  • horse shoe: J. Ricks; March 30, 1885
  • ice cream scooper: A. L. Cralle; February 2, 1897
  • improv. sugar making: Norbet Rillieux; December 10, 1846
  • insect-destroyer gun: A. C. Richard; February 28, 1899
  • ironing board: Sarah Boone; December 30, 1887
  • key chain: F. J. Loudin; January 9, 1894
  • lantern: Michael C. Harvey; August 19, 1884
  • lawn mower: L. A. Burr; May 19, 1889
  • lawn sprinkler: J. W. Smith; May 4, 1897
  • lemon squeezer: J. Thomas White; December 8, 1893
  • lock: W. A. Martin; July 23, 18–
  • lubricating cup: Ellijah McCoy; November 15, 1895
  • lunch pail: James Robinson; 1887
  • mail box: Paul L. Downing; October 27, 1891
  • mop: Thomas W. Stewart; June 11, 1893
  • motor: Frederick M. Jones; June 27, 1939
  • peanut butter: George Washington Carver; 1896
  • pencil sharpener: J. L. Love; November 23, 1897
  • record player arm: Joseph Hunger Dickenson January 8, 1819
  • refrigerator: J. Standard; June 14, 1891
  • riding saddles: W. D. Davis; October 6, 1895
  • rolling pin: John W. Reed; 1864
  • shampoo headrest: C. O. Bailiff; October 11, 1898
  • spark plug: Edmond Berger; February 2, 1839
  • stethoscope: Imhotep; Ancient Egypt
  • stove: T. A. Carrington; July 25, 1876
  • straightening comb: Madam C. J. Walker; Approx 1905
  • street sweeper: Charles B. Brooks; March 17, 1890
  • phone transmitter: Granville T. Woods; December 2, 1884
  • thermostat control: Frederick M. Jones; February 23, 1960
  • traffic light: Garrett Morgan; November 20, 1923
  • tricycle: M. A. Cherry; May 6, 1886
  • typewriter: Burridge & Marshman; April 7, 1885

BUT OH MAN WHAT WILL WE DO WITHOUT MCDONALDS :(((

This is the greatest response in history


hold-on-till-day:

I found my senior quote.

(Source: sensationalsherri)


jdotslack:

immabadnatural:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

how people miss the racial commentary of this song is still so astounding to me. it’s so clearly a fuck white beauty standards song.

most white people so drunk off whiteness, they don’t even get it.

who knew though…… by 2014, white people would “discover” twerking and  convince themselves that jennifer lopez and other white bitches made booty a good thing to have. lol.

they still can’t admit that black women are beautiful. they will just keep magic wand selecting all of our features as beautiful, but not beautiful on us.

I keep explaining this to white folks.

do people not even listen to the lyrics though?

(Source: ghatia)


thecollection613:

con-la-muerte:

xkittykaattx:

sasstrid-and-dorkcup:

madehimsaycomfychairs:

floacist:

iwishitwas1983:

I’m crying.

LMAOOOOOOOOO the screaming in the beginning

"mr. owl"
"oh jesus christ"
"please don’t give me that look"
"please don’t fly"

DYING omg

That owl is 30000000% done

every time this video graces me with its presence i feel obliged to reblog it

never fails 

Lolol omg I’m done

Reblog every time

(Source: becausebirds)


dripping-adorableness:

mrcheyl:

Power [x]

When this first came out, I was so lost and didn’t get it. As I got older, I realized how visuals really worked

"College as explained to me in high school" vs. "College as experienced firsthand"
  • In high school they told us: There will be no grades in a class except the midterm and the final, so you have to study hard because failing one test means you fail the class.
  • Once I was in college a professor said: Hey, you guys are working really hard on your third paper, so I'm just going to cancel the final and give everyone a hundred on it.
  • In high school they told us: In college, class always begins exactly at the scheduled start time. If your class is at 9 AM and you get there at 9:01, the doors will be locked and you'll be out of luck, especially if it's the day of the midterm or final, because then you get a zero.
  • Once I was in college a professor said: Does anyone mind if I start class at 3:35 instead of 3:30? These elevators are really slow and I want to have time for a cigarette before I teach for 90 minutes.
  • In high school they told us: Every class you miss drops you a full letter grade in college courses.
  • Once I was in college almost every professor said: You can miss three classes without a penalty, and a few more if you have a Doctor's note. Sorry to be a hardass, but you automatically fail if you miss more than ten days of class.
  • In high school they told us: If you do have papers, your professors just lecture and put the assignments on the syllabus. You're completely responsible for remembering the deadlines, they won't remind you. All your professors will do is lecture and the rest is up to you.
  • Once I was in college a professor said: Okay, so your next paper is in two weeks! I'll keep reminding you in the interim, but I just want to make sure you have enough time to do it! Let's run through the structure I want to see real quick, and if you have any questions, feel free to email me or come to my office hours!
  • In high school they told us: You have to use MLA formatting and if you make any mistakes in your citations, it'll be considered plagiarism. You'll be expelled and probably sued.
  • Once I was in college almost every professor said: Please do not use MLA, it is awful, we use either APA or Chicago here because we are not 14 years old.
  • In high school they told me: There is no excuse for an absence. NONE.
  • In college I called a professor and said: I'm really, really, really sorry but it's -18 before windchill and I have to walk two miles to get to class.
  • The professor said: You stay inside and stay safe. Here's what we're reading today. I'll quiz you next week and if you can get a 90% I'll mark you present. I know you live off-campus, do you have food?
  • In high school they told me: Your advisor is just for academia, not personal problems.
  • In college my advisor called me: Are you okay? I haven't seen you in class in two weeks and I know you have depression. I can drop off your work if you'd like. Please call me and tell me how you're doing even if you can't get to class.
  • In high school they told me: Don't argue. You think this is bad, wait til college.
  • In college all but one of my professors said: You wanna argue, do it in a civil manner. We didn't get here today without 5000 years of healthy debate.

perriencess:

i wish i was one of those blogs that give people heart attack by reblogging their stuff

(Source: leiqhannes)